Organization of the Daily Preschool Academy Schedule

 The daily schedule includes events, which take place in the classroom.  The daily schedule provides specific times for events to occur in order to help children and adults organize the day.  Consistency and predictability are important characteristics of the daily routine.  Consistency helps children maintain order in their lives and make predictions concerning their actions.  It also allows children to build trust in the environment.  An example of a classroom schedule follows:

 Sample Class Schedule

 

8:30 - 9:00   Arrival

            9:00 - 10:30  Table Top Activities

            10:30 - 11:00     Snack/Social Groups

(Structured and Unstructured Small Groups)

            11:00 - 11:30     Gross motor activity, Obstacle course, or Recess

            11:30-12:00     Art/Music Time 

         12:00-1:00 Lunch

1:00-2:00  Circle/Story Time

            2:00-3:00      Free Play in Centers

           (Structured and Unstructured Small Groups)

3:00 - 3:30   Gross motor activity, Obstacle course, or Recess

 

Organization of the Daily K-2 Academy Schedule

 The daily schedule includes events, which take place in the classroom.  The daily schedule provides specific times for events to occur in order to help children and adults organize the day.  Consistency and predictability are important characteristics of the daily routine.  Consistency helps children maintain order in their lives and make predictions concerning their actions.  It also allows children to build trust in the environment.  An example of a K-2 classroom schedule follows:

 Sample Class Schedule

 8:30 - 9:00   Arrival

            9:00 - 10:30  Reading, Writing, Math, Science 

            10:30 - 11:00     Snack/Social Groups

(Structured and Unstructured Small Groups)

            11:00 - 11:30     Gross motor activity, Obstacle course, or Recess

            11:30-12:00     Art/Music Time 

         12:00-1:00 Lunch

1:00-2:30 Reading, Writing, Math, Science

            2:30-3:00     Snack/Social Groups

(Structured and Unstructured Small Groups)

3:00 - 3:30   Gross motor activity, Obstacle course, or Recess

 

SPECIAL WEEKLY ACTIVITIES

 

"Star of the Week”

            Every week a child will be selected to be "Star of the Week".  This will give the child an opportunity to share something about themselves with their peers.  Not only should the child feel special, but also clinicians may learn something new and interesting about the child that may be particularly beneficial in intervention.  Children and their parents will be provided a poster board to decorate anyway they see fit.  For example, the poster board could include some photos of the child on vacation, with family members, and doing some favorite activities.  It could also include a self-portrait or a list of "favorites things" such as foods or movies.  After the child has had an opportunity to share the poster during opening circle, the poster is mounted in the class for the week.  The star should also be invited to bring a favorite toy to demonstrate.

 

Cooking

            Children will have the opportunity to prepare, or cook, their own snack today.  This can either be incorporated individually as a center during free play or immediately following opening circle as a group activity.  Again, this activity needs to reinforce important targeted concepts such as hot and cold or sweet and sour, fine motor skills such as stirring or rolling, and/or introduce aspects of counting and measuring.  Each child needs to have the opportunity to participate.  Whatever is created will then serve as the principle snack for the day.  Before and during snack, clinicians need to facilitate a conversation about the prepared snack to reinforce learned and related concepts.

 

Centers: Group art project

            Children will be invited to participate in some sort of group project that will ultimately be displayed in the hall until the next week's art project.  These projects should be big and fun and thoughtfully prepared!  Even if the child is very "anti-art," the project should be an inviting opportunity to explore the medium.  Examples include foot painting when the unit is "My body" or building and painting an eclectic "house" sculpture constructed from empty cardboard boxes and tubes when the unit is "My house."

 Color of the Week:  "Blue, blue… who's wearing blue?"

            The lead teacher will reinforce the color of the week by showing a few items of that color and then asking the children to help find the color in the clothes they are wearing.  If someone does not have on the day's color, the teacher needs to have a special sticker or something similar in order to make sure everyone can participate in this activity.  On this particular day, it might be useful to reinforce the colors and shapes by placing props in each of the centers that incorporate these ideas.  Ask the child to select his/her center choice and then show something that is either blue or round in that play area.

 

Science/Number concept development

            A hand's on lesson to introduce an important developmental concept should be included in this circle time.  It should be followed with a related story, song, or large motor activity.  For example, one of the fall semester's weekly themes is about "My house."  Children can help test which kind of house is stronger (toothpicks, popsicle sticks or blocks) and follow with the story of The 3 Little Pigs.  If the unit is on "My Body," a discussion about the functions of body parts can include small groups experimenting with a stethoscope or a flashlight to see inside their friends' ears and mouth or looking at x-rays on the window. The song, "Head, shoulders, knees and toes" might follow.  If the unit is Flower Shop, children can inspect dissected flowers and buds with a magnifying glass and do their own experiment with the two colored dyes and carnation to learn how water is carried up in the stem.  Following this experiment with an appropriate story or an adaptation to the clapping rhyme,  "Who stole the cookies (flowers) from the cookie jar (flower shop)?

 

Snack: Specially prepared by the Star of the Week

            The Star of the Week should provide the snack for this day.  Parents need to be instructed about the week's designated theme and targeted color and sound.  Snacks should be chosen that correspond with one of these important concepts and the children should share in the selection and cooking of the snack.  For example, if the theme is "All about Me" and the shape is circle, a perfect snack might be face cookies or pizza muffins.  If the color were blue, blue popsicles or Jell-O would be good choices.  It is the teachers' responsibility to encourage creative and special snacks, and then to follow through with an enthusiastic, interactive discussion about the snack with the class.  It is a terrific way to, once again, teach and enforce basic concepts.

 

Program Philosophy

Academy Tuition

Organization of the Daily Schedule

Program Principles and Values

Enhancement Services for Students

Preschool Academy Curriculum 3-5 yr

K-2 Academy Curriculum

Handwriting Curriculum

Music Program

Monitoring Your Child's Progress

Program Policies

Family-Centered

Speech & Language Teaching Strategies

The Importance of Social Interaction